Secret operations are essential in war

Some people may or may not realize that we are at war, and just as our brave men and women in uniform, some of continue to fight, even on the holidays. Some of us fight by exposing the deception that those who are out to destroy our great country. One such deception is the latest tread on Twitter and the net, “Congress to Vote Next Week on EXPLICITLY Creating a Police State“. Is this stealth by the left to kill a bill that funds our military? Do they really think no one is paying attention? Well, in some cases, I say yes, who is going to be bothered to read the 682 pages of a bill to find out what’s REALLY going on. Thanks to the one saying I’ve learned to live by through out my life and Glenn Beck has stressed, “Question with Boldness…” I did, and what I found is not, in my opinion, what is contained in Senate Bill S. 1867.

From the article, “The ACLU’s Washington legislative office explains:

The Senate is gearing up for a vote on Monday or Tuesday that goes to the very heart of who we are as Americans. The Senate will be voting on a bill that will direct American military resources not at an enemy shooting at our military in a war zone, but at American citizens and other civilians far from any battlefield — even people in the United States itself. “

The article continues, “The power is so broad that even U.S. citizens could be swept up by the military and the military could be used far from any battlefield, even within the United States itself. The worldwide indefinite detention without charge or trial provision is in S. 1867, the National Defense Authorization Act bill, which will be on the Senate floor on Monday. Interesting thing in this quote is a link to an ACLU petition.

Now, first things first, how many of you REALLY believe that the American Civil Liberties Union is really looking out for the everyday American citizen? I for one don’t trust them and that’s why I, “Questioned with Boldness…” and check it out. No, I’m not going to go through the entire S. 1867 , “A Bill To authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2012 for military activities of the Department of Defense, for military construction, and for defense activities of the Department of Energy, to prescribe military personnel strengths  for such fiscal year, and for other purposes.  (‘‘National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012’’)

Like all Bills from congress this is about as much fun to read as it is getting root canal. So here is what the two sections that ACLU cite, really says.

Section 1031, begins on page 359. (I will add my personal comments where I feel people should question…OM)

Subtitle D—Detainee Matters

SEC. 1031. AFFIRMATION OF AUTHORITY OF THE ARMED 5FORCES OF THE UNITED STATES TO DETAIN COVERED PERSONS PURSUANT TO THE AUTHORIZATION FOR USE OF MILITARY FORCE. (To me, this refers to war and a war zone….OM)

IN GENERAL.—Congress affirms that the authority of the President to use all necessary and appropriate force pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (Public Law 107–40  {Joint resolution to authorize the use of United States Armed Forces against those responsible for the recent attacks launched against the United States} ) includes the authority for the Armed Forces of the United States to detain covered persons (as defined in subsection (b)) pending disposition under the law of war.

COVERED PERSONS. A covered person under this section is any person as follows: (1) A person who planned, authorized, committed, or aided the terrorist attacks that occurred on September 11, 2001, or harbored those responsible for those attacks. (2) A person who was a part of or substantially supported al-Qaeda, the Taliban, or associated forces that are engaged in hostilities against the United States or its coalition partners, including any person who has committed a belligerent act or has directly supported such hostilities in aid of such enemy forces. (Sounds like enemies of our country…OM)

(c) DISPOSITION UNDER LAW OF WAR.—The disposition of a person under the law of war as described in subsection (a) may include the following: (1) Detention under the law of war without trial until the end of the hostilities authorized by the Authorization for Use of Military Force. (In every other war, from Revolution to Vietnam, a person captured on the battle field was detained until, the war ended or a prison exchange…OM). (2) Trial under chapter 47A of title 10, United 10 States Code (as amended by the Military Commissions Act of 2009 (title XVIII of Public Law 111–12 84)). (3) Transfer for trial by an alternative court or competent tribunal having lawful jurisdiction. (4) Transfer to the custody or control of the person’s country of origin, any other foreign country, or any other foreign entity. (Now, is this the real reason the ACLU opposes this bill, think back on how hard the ACLU has pushed to bring those captured on the battle field here for trial in civilian court. …OM)

(d) CONSTRUCTION. Nothing in this section is intended to limit or expand the authority of the President or the scope of the Authorization for Use of Military Force.

(e) REQUIREMENT FOR BRIEFINGS OF CONGRESS.  The Secretary of Defense shall regularly brief Congress regarding the application of the authority described in this section, including the organizations, entities, and individuals considered to be ‘‘covered persons’’ for purposes of subsection (b)(2).

Now, after reading and rereading the above section, I personally do not see anything that the United States has not done in every war we have fought since the Revolution. As I have noted, this continues the practice of holding and trying the POW’s at Gitmo, which everyone should know, ACLU and the regime’ has opposed since the beginning of the war on terror. Nothing to see here, let’s move on to Section 1032, page 361.

SEC. 1032. REQUIREMENT FOR MILITARY CUSTODY

(a) CUSTODY PENDING DISPOSITION UNDER LAW OF WAR.

(1) IN GENERAL.—Except as provided in paragraph (4), the Armed Forces of the United States shall hold a person described in paragraph (2) who is captured in the course of hostilities authorized by the Authorization for Use of Military Force (Public 11 Law 107–40) in military custody pending disposition under the law of war.

(2) COVERED PERSONS.—The requirement in paragraph (1) shall apply to any person whose detention is authorized under section 1031 who is determined (A) to be a member of, or part of, al-Qaeda or an associated force that acts in coordination with or pursuant to the direction of al-Qaeda; and (B) to have participated in the course of planning or carrying out an attack or attempted attack against the United States or its coalition partners. (Now, here is the only thing that might deal with American citizens, basically those who have betrayed America by siding with the enemy. Personally, I would like to give them a fair trial then hang them. To me, they are traitors….OM)

(3) DISPOSITION UNDER LAW OF WAR. For purposes of this subsection, the disposition of a person under the law of war has the meaning given in section 1031(c), except that no transfer otherwise described in paragraph (4) of that section shall be made unless consistent with the requirements of section 1033.

(4) WAIVER FORNATIONAL SECURITY. The Secretary of Defense may, in consultation with the Secretary of State and the Director of National Intelligence, waive the requirement of paragraph (1) if the Secretary submits to Congress a certification in writing that such a waiver is in the national security interests of theUnited States.

(b) APPLICABILITY TO UNITED STATES CITIZENS AND LAWFUL RESIDENT ALIENS.

(1) UNITED STATES CITIZENS. The requirement to detain a person in military custody under this section does not extend to citizens of the United States.

(2) LAWFUL RESIDENT ALIENS. The requirement to detain a person in military custody under this section does not extend to a lawful resident alien of theUnited Stateson the basis of conduct taking place within theUnited States, except to the extent permitted by the Constitution of theUnited States.

(c) IMPLEMENTATION PROCEDURES.

(1) IN GENERAL. Not later than 60 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the President shall issue, and submit to Congress, procedures for implementing this section. (Now, here is the one thing we may have to worry about, but we do have to trust in Congress to ensure that BH0 doesn’t overstep his authority….OM)

(2) ELEMENTS. The procedures for implementing this section shall include, but not be limited to, procedures as follows: (A) Procedures designating the persons authorized to make determinations under subsection (a)(2) and the process by which such determinations are to be made. (B) Procedures providing that the requirement for military custody under subsection (a)(1) does not require the interruption of ongoing surveillance or intelligence gathering with regard to persons not already in the custody or control of the United States. (Something else the ACLU has often fought against…OM). (C) Procedures providing that a determination under subsection (a)(2) is not required to be implemented until after the conclusion of an interrogation session which is ongoing at the time the determination is made and does not require the interruption of any such ongoing session. (D) Procedures providing that the requirement for military custody under subsection (a)(1) does not apply when intelligence, law enforcement, or other government officials of the United States are granted access to an individual who remains in the custody of a third country. (E) Procedures providing that a certification of national security interests under subsection (a)(4) may be granted for the purpose of transferring a covered person from a third country if such a transfer is in the interest of  the United States and could not otherwise be accomplished.

(d) EFFECTIVE DATE.—This section shall take effect on the date that is 60 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, and shall apply with respect to persons described in subsection (a)(2) who are taken into the custody or brought under the control of theUnited Stateson or after that effective date.

Now, again I ask, just where is there anything contained in these section that the ACLU references that has anything to do with creating a police state? Is the ACLU using deception by claiming this to have true patriots, who don’t take time to research and just believes what they see on the web, to attempt to influence the senate not to pass this bill?

This bill contains sections, such as (1) Specification of period in which application for voter registration or absentee ballot from an overseas voter is valid (Sec. 585) (Maybe the ACLU would rather have Democratic Secretary of States  suppress the Military vote…OM) or maybe (2) Waiver of ‘‘Buy American’’ requirement for procurement of components otherwise producible overseas with specialty metal not produced in the United States (Sec. 846) (Send more money overseas, maybe part of U.N.’s economy plans…OM). OR the Sec. 1034, Prohibition on use of funds to construct or modify facilities in the Sec. 1034. Prohibition on use of funds to construct or modify facilities in theUnited Statesto house detainees transferred from United States Naval Station,Guantanamo Bay,Cuba. (If there is no where in the United Statesto house the prisoners, then the ACLU can not use the courts to allow our enemies to go free. …OM)

Now, before people jump on a “bandwagon” that is being pushed by a known Progressive / Socialist Organization, an organization funded by Soros who is determine to destroy the American way of life, like the ACLU, maybe they should take time to check into the idea there is an ulterior motive. Remember, “Secret operations are essential in war; upon them the army relies to make its every move.” Sun Tzu.

Semper Fi

About Old Marine

I was a Vietnam Vet, before being one was popular. After serving 14 years in the Marines, attended college and earned degrees in Chemistry and Geology. Currently working as both for a state agency. @OldMarine1 on Twitter.
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6 Responses to Secret operations are essential in war

  1. Hobbes says:

    Good post, OM.

  2. gladimamerican says:

    If some of these have been done in every war, why do they need to be addressed again? If this is coming out of a demon controlled senate, I question everything. I do NOT like the waiver for “Buy American”, when will we learn that we have no “friends” and trusting, say China for anything to do with our military is dangerous at best. Remember the sheetrock that China exported? It had up to 100 x’s hydrogen sulphide levels of non Chinese drywall. China has control of the largest amount of “rare earth” metals, already they are able to dictate the cost of metals needed for our defense http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2010-09-29/pentagon… We better wake up and look at them for what they are, the enemy, inactive for now but for how long?

    • Old Marine says:

      Glad,

      I agree! As I said in post, it is an agenda by the ACLU to defund / stop Gitmo and the holding of enemy combatants OFF shore to ensure that they do not stand trial in U.S.

      I feel that the American people are being “frightened” into doing things without really checking the facts. It seems, whatever “bandwagon” (flavor of the day) sounds good by some personality, then everyone is for or against until the next one comes along. With the net and commonsense the facts can be found.

  3. John Galt says:

    Gladimamerican has the focus on the Chinese, which I concur with that assessment, however can any & all folks be thrown into this category? Padilla is an American citizens held in Charleston S.C. for 3 years without a trial! Whereas little Johnny Walker Lynn was tried in a federal court!

  4. Old Marine says:

    Johnny Walker Lynn was captured on the battlefield in 2001, right after the war began thus as an American citizen they returned him to states. BEFORE the Patriot Act. Padilla was captured on American soil in 2002, After Patriot Act. Before the Patriot Act it was “gray” area, after it was cut and dry.

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